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Treating Renal Failure with TCVM

Treating Renal Failure with TCVM

By Carolina Medina DVM, CVA, CVCH, CVT, CVFT

Author: Chi Institute/Thursday, April 1, 2010/Categories: Student Case Reports, TCVM Newsletter, 2010 Spring Issue

In TCVM, renal failure is characterized as Long Bi syndrome which also includes difficult urination, urinary incontinence and other kidney related diseases. Long refers to milder conditions such as dysuria and stranguria. Bi refers to severe disorders such as oliguria and anuria. Congenital defects occur due to Kidney Jing deficiency. Chronic illness, aging, over-work or congenital weakness can gradually damage Kidney Jing leading to deficiency of Kidney Qi, Yin or Yang. Therefore, the TCVM patterns associated with renal failure include Kidney Jing Deficiency, Kidney Qi Deficiency, Kidney Yin Deficiency and Kidney Yang Deficiency. 


The clinical signs associated with Kidney Jing Deficiency are renal failure at a young age, congenital defects, poor neonatal growth and development, developmental bone disease and/or premature aging. The tongue can be pale or red and the pulses are usually weak. Acupoints used to treat Kidney Jing deficiency include KID3, BL20, BL21, BL22, BL23, BL26, BL39 and SP3. The herbal formula Epimedium Formula should be prescribed in order to tonify Qi, nourish Kidney Yin and Yang, Jing and Blood. For patients with Kidney Jing deficiency, it is imperative to provide good nutrition and strengthen their Spleen Qi to support their post-natal Jing. In these cases, a good balanced diet that is neither too hot nor too cold is best, paying particular attention to Qi tonics like chicken and beef. Tui-na techniques that can be done to improve the clinical outcome include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) along BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) and An-Fa (Pressing) around CV8 clockwise 12 times and counter-clockwise 12 times, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at CV3, CV4, CV6, SP6, KID3, BL20, BL23 and BL28, and Nie-Fa (Pinching) along the back from caudal to rostral.

The clinical signs associated with Kidney Qi Deficiency are renal failure with urinary incontinence, dysuria, stranguria and/or hind end weakness. The tongue is typically pale and wet and the pulses are deep and weak. Acupoints used to treat Kidney Qi deficiency are KID1, KID3, KID7, KID10, CV4, CV6, BL23, BL39, ST36 and LI10. The herbal formula Suo Quan Wan can be used to treat acute renal failure due to Kidney Qi Deficiency. The herbal formula Jin Suo Gu Jing can be used to treat chronic renal failure due to Kidney Qi deficiency.  Foods that tonify Qi can be added to the diet to improve the overall clinical outcome. Such Qi tonics include beef, chicken, sweet potatoes and shitake mushrooms. Tui-na techniques that can benefit these cases include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) from BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at SP6 and KID3, Ca-Fa (Rubbing) from BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Nie-Fa (Pinching) along the back from caudal to rostral, and Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) from BL28 to BL11 and from CV8 to CV2 back and forth 12 times.

The clinical signs associated with Kidney Yin Deficiency are renal failure with dysuria, stranguria, generalized erythema, cool-seeking behavior, excessive panting and restlessness at night. The tongue is red and dry and the pulses are deep, thready and weak. Acupoints used to treat Kidney Yin Deficiency include KID3, KID7, KID10, BL22, BL23, BL39, SP6 and SP9. The herbal formula Lui Wei Di Huang can be used to nourish Yin and Jing, tonify Kidney Qi and drain excess Damp. Cool and Yin tonic foods such as rabbit, barley, string beans and tomatoes can be added to the diet. Tui-na techniques that are beneficial to these cases include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) along BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) and An-Fa (Pressing) around CV8 clockwise 12 times and counter-clockwise 12 times, and Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at CV3, CV4, CV6, SP6, KID3, BL20, BL23 and BL28.

The clinical signs associated with Kidney Yang Deficiency are renal failure with copious clear urine or urinary incontinence, warm-seeking behavior and/or lower back pain. The tongue is usually pale, wet and swollen and the pulses are weak and deep. Acupoints used to treat Kidney Yang deficiency include GV3, GV4, KID7, KID10, BL26, BL39, Bai hui, Shen shu, Shen peng and Shen jiao. The herbal formula Jin Gui Shen Qi Wan can be used to tonify Kidney Qi and Yang, nourish Yin, Blood and Jing, drain Damp and strengthen the Spleen. Alternatively, Zhen Wu Tang can be given to tonify Kidney Yang, drain Damp and promote urination. Caution should be taken when using either formula in cats or geriatrics as they both contain Fu Zi (Aconite). Warm and Yang tonic foods such as chicken, lamb, sweet potatoes and turnips can be given to treat this pattern. Tui-na techniques that can be employed by the practitioner or the owner include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) from BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at SP6 and KID3, Ca-Fa (Rubbing) from BL20 to BL35 and CV8 to CV2,   Nie-Fa (Pinching) along the back from caudal to rostral, and Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) from BL28 to BL11 and from CV8 to CV2 back and forth 12 times.

The key to properly treat renal failure with TCVM is to first determine the TCVM pattern. These patterns include Kidney Jing Deficiency, Kidney Qi Deficiency, Kidney Yin Deficiency and Kidney Yang Deficiency. A thorough physical examination and clinical history along with tongue and pulse qualities can help the practitioner determine the TCVM pattern. Once the pattern is chosen then the proper therapy can be instituted using acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, food therapy and Tui-na massage. These modalities can be beneficial in managing both acute and chronic renal failure cases. In most instances the integrative approach of Western and Eastern medicine provides the best clinical outcome and promotion of a good quality of life.

iency. The herbal formula Jin Suo Gu Jing can be used to treat chronic renal failure due to Kidney Qi deficiency.  Foods that tonify Qi can be added to the diet to improve the overall clinical outcome. Such Qi tonics include beef, chicken, sweet potatoes and shitake mushrooms. Tui-na techniques that can benefit these cases include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) from BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at SP6 and KID3, Ca-Fa (Rubbing) from BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Nie-Fa (Pinching) along the back from caudal to rostral, and Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) from BL28 to BL11 and from CV8 to CV2 back and forth 12 times.

The clinical signs associated with Kidney Yin Deficiency are renal failure with dysuria, stranguria, generalized erythema, cool-seeking behavior, excessive panting and restlessness at night. The tongue is red and dry and the pulses are deep, thready and weak. Acupoints used to treat Kidney Yin Deficiency include KID3, KID7, KID10, BL22, BL23, BL39, SP6 and SP9. The herbal formula Lui Wei Di Huang can be used to nourish Yin and Jing, tonify Kidney Qi and drain excess Damp. Cool and Yin tonic foods such as rabbit, barley, string beans and tomatoes can be added to the diet. Tui-na techniques that are beneficial to these cases include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) along BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) and An-Fa (Pressing) around CV8 clockwise 12 times and counter-clockwise 12 times, and Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at CV3, CV4, CV6, SP6, KID3, BL20, BL23 and BL28.

The clinical signs associated with Kidney Yang Deficiency are renal failure with copious clear urine or urinary incontinence, warm-seeking behavior and/or lower back pain. The tongue is usually pale, wet and swollen and the pulses are weak and deep. Acupoints used to treat Kidney Yang deficiency include GV3, GV4, KID7, KID10, BL26, BL39, Bai hui, Shen shu, Shen peng and Shen jiao. The herbal formula Jin Gui Shen Qi Wan can be used to tonify Kidney Qi and Yang, 
nourish Yin, Blood and Jing, drain Damp and strengthen the Spleen. Alternatively, Zhen Wu Tang can be given to tonify Kidney Yang, drain Damp and promote urination. Caution should be taken when using either formula in cats or geriatrics as they both contain Fu Zi (Aconite). Warm and Yang tonic foods such as chicken, lamb, sweet potatoes and turnips can be given to treat this pattern. Tui-na techniques that can be employed by the practitioner or the owner include: Mo-Fa (Touching Skin and Muscle) from BL20 to BL28 and CV8 to CV2, Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) at SP6 and KID3, Ca-Fa (Rubbing) from BL20 to BL35 and CV8 to CV2,   Nie-Fa (Pinching) along the back from caudal to rostral, and Rou-Fa (Rotary-Kneading) from BL28 to BL11 and from CV8 to CV2 back and forth 12 times.

The key to properly treat renal failure with TCVM is to first determine the TCVM pattern. These patterns include Kidney Jing Deficiency, Kidney Qi Deficiency, Kidney Yin Deficiency and Kidney Yang Deficiency. A thorough physical examination and clinical history along with tongue and pulse qualities can help the practitioner determine the TCVM pattern. Once the pattern is chosen then the proper therapy can be instituted using acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, food therapy and Tui-na massage. These modalities can be beneficial in managing both acute and chronic renal failure cases. In most instances the integrative approach of Western and Eastern medicine provides the best clinical outcome and promotion of a good quality of life.

 

 


 

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