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How I Got Into Traditonal Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture

How I Got Into Traditonal Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture

by Ronald Koh, DVM, MS, CVA, CCRP, CVCH, CVFT

Switching from a general practitioner to a TCVM practitioner, I often get the question, “How did you get into acupuncture or Chinese medicine?”  While my story is pretty typical, I believe the most interesting thing about it is that I know it is not just my own story, but it is shared with hundreds of other veterinarians who found belief and faith in TCVM the way I do.
Tuesday, September 1, 2015/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (725)/Comments (0)/
How to Treat Cushing’s Disease

How to Treat Cushing’s Disease

by Ronald Koh, DVM, MS, CVA, CCRP, CVCH, CVFT

 Hyperadrenocorticism, or Cushing’s disease, is a condition where the adrenal glands produce excessive glucocorticoid hormones and results in clinical signs such as a increased thirst, increased urination, increased hunger, pendulous abdomen, enlarged liver, hair loss, lethargy, muscle weakness, obesity, increased panting, skin changes, and immunosuppression. Cushing's Disease can be subdivided into pituitary dependent (85% of all cases) and adrenal dependent (15% of all cases). Currently, two medications that are commonly used to treat pituitary dependent Cushing's disease are mitotane and trilostane. Both of these medications have their respective benefits and side effects. Side effects such as weakness, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, and ataxia occur in dogs receiving mitotane or trilostane. If not treated, Cushing’s disease is usually progressive in nature with a poor prognosis for quality.
Monday, August 31, 2015/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2331)/Comments (0)/
Food Therapy in Treatment of Chronic Anemia

Food Therapy in Treatment of Chronic Anemia

by Liz Fernandez, DVM, CVA

“Kobe” was an M/N 80 lbs Yellow Labrador with a Fire personality. His DOB was 12/30/97. He had been on maintenance TCVM treatments since he was 12 years-old for lumbosacral arthritis, spondylosis, and cervical IVDD (diagnosed with MRI). TCVM diagnosis was Kidney Qi and Yin Deficiency, Liver Yin Deficiency, Jing Deficiency as well as Bi and Wei Syndrome. Treatment included acupuncture and Tui-na. This treatment was on going every 2-4 weeks. Herbal formulas included Body Sore 8 Teapills BID and Hindquarter Weakness 8 Teapills BID. Tramadol 50mg 1/2-1 pill BID was used for pain as needed, and Adequan 1.5cc Q 2 weeks for joint support. He was also given Thyroid Support (Standard Process) for low thyroid1 tsp BID, Normalizer 3 1 BID (digestive enzyme/probiotic supplement for Immune support)
Friday, August 28, 2015/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (918)/Comments (0)/
TCVM Treatment of Feline Vestibular Disease

TCVM Treatment of Feline Vestibular Disease

by Elizabeth McKinstry, VMD

A 7 year old spayed female DSH presented for a 5 month history of vestibular disease which had not responded to a previous treatment of antibiotics followed by a homeopathic remedy.   The cat was treated with acupuncture, a chinese herbal formula Stasis in Mansion of Mind, depo medrol, and antibiotics. All symptoms were completely resolved within one month.

 

Friday, August 28, 2015/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (814)/Comments (0)/
Acupuncture Treatment for Treating Forelimb Extensors Muscle Atrophy

Acupuncture Treatment for Treating Forelimb Extensors Muscle Atrophy

by José R. Castro, DVM, DABVP-Equine, DACVS-LA

This case reports the successful treatment of a 5-month-old, American Quarter Horse colt that was presented for severe buckling of his right carpus caused by neurogenic muscle atrophy of the Extensor Carpus Radialis and Common Digital Extensor muscles. The colt was treated for a period of three months using Dry Needle, Aqua-acupuncture, Electro-acupuncture, Pneumo-acupuncture and Herbal medicine. 

 

 

Friday, August 28, 2015/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (711)/Comments (0)/
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