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Assessing and Promoting Quality of Life in Geriatric Patients

Assessing and Promoting Quality of Life in Geriatric Patients

Huisheng Xie, DVM PhD and Vanessa Preast, DVM

As companion animals’ life spans increase, geriatric health care becomes a focus of veterinary practice. With geriatric patients, the primary goal is to promote their quality of life rather than cure their diseases. A number of reports have demonstrated that Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) could help accomplish this goal.1-3 

Saturday, November 1, 2008/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (3615)/Comments (0)/
Dang Gui Bu Xue Tang and Diet Change as a Treatment for Hemangiosarcoma

Dang Gui Bu Xue Tang and Diet Change as a Treatment for Hemangiosarcoma

By Ruth Roberts DVM, CVA

Murphy is a 6 yo mn obese lab who had a mass removed on July 2006, it was a hemangiosarcoma; the mass recurred on February 2007 and was removed with clear margins. The prognosis was 6 to 8 months and 12 to 16 months with chemotherapy. The owner declined chemotherapy and elected to pursue a TCVM approach.
Saturday, November 1, 2008/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (1938)/Comments (0)/
Diabetes Mellitus Controlled  with TCVM

Diabetes Mellitus Controlled with TCVM

By Jody Bearman, DVM, CVA

In March of this year, I received a phone call on a Wednesday from frantic owners telling me that they needed their dog cured by Friday.  They said that he had superficial necrolytic dermatitis and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus,  couldn’t move at all or eat, and their vet had said to euthanize him. 
Saturday, November 1, 2008/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2307)/Comments (0)/
Di Gu Pi in a Hip Displasya Case

Di Gu Pi in a Hip Displasya Case

By Cindy Wallis, DVM, CVA

Sandy, aka 'Girlfriend', a spayed 12 year old Golden Retriever, first presented to me as a 'last resort' on 5/11/2007. Her owner was considering euthanasia due to her declining quality of life from progressive degenerative joint disease, ie. 'hip dysplasia'.
Saturday, November 1, 2008/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2088)/Comments (0)/
How to Integrate Herbal Medicine into Your Practice

How to Integrate Herbal Medicine into Your Practice

By Tiffany Rimar DVM, CVA

The first step to integrate herbal medicine into your Veterinary practice is to just simply DO IT! This can be an intimidating process but if you follow a few simple steps you too can make an easy transition to create synergistic medical results. First, a clear understanding of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) tenants and diagnosis needs to be the foundation. Herbal preparations, energetics, properties and methods of administration need to be understood. Knowing some common mistakes and how to prevent or overcome them can build confidence and enhance clinical results.  Examples of commonly used formulas can help start an herbal pharmacy. Knowledge of any other medications or modalities being used is an important consideration as this may alter an herbal plan. The final step to master, which is always a continual process, when integrating a new modality into your practice and your life is….Harmony.  
Saturday, November 1, 2008/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2284)/Comments (0)/
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