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TCVM Treatment of Intervertebral Disk Disease

TCVM Treatment of Intervertebral Disk Disease

by Huisheng Xie, DVM PhD MS

Intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) is commonly seen in small animal clinics. Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM), including acupuncture and herbal medicine, can be the effective sole therapy, or part of integrated therapy with Western medicine and surgery. This paper explains the TCVM etiology/ pathology and treatment of IVDD, and predicted outcome along with clinical case studies.

Friday, April 1, 2011/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (11153)/Comments (0)/
How I Treat Wei and Bi Syndrome with TCVM

How I Treat Wei and Bi Syndrome with TCVM

By Bruce Ferguson, DVM, CVA, CVCH, CVFT

TCVM is such an effective medical system because it is both integrative and individuated. By integrative I mean that we commonly combine acupuncture, herbal medicine, tui-na, and food therapies into a treatment regimen. Individuation implies that we seek the actual energetic disharmony in our patients before choosing treatment strategies rather than merely treating a broad disease “name” in all patients with the same strategies without considering their unique status1.
Monday, November 1, 2010/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (9468)/Comments (0)/
Chinese Veterinary Herbal Toxicity

Chinese Veterinary Herbal Toxicity

by Huisheng Xie, DVM, PhD, MS

Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has been administered to animals in China for more than 4,000 years.1 Many clinical studies have indicated that CHM is effective for treating a wide variety of medical conditions in the areas of cardiology2, dermatology3, endocrinology4, gastroenterology5, reproduction6, oncology7, immunology8, pulmonology9 and musculoskeletal conditions10. However, Chinese herbs are drugs. We must treat them as pharmaceutical medications. As CHM is more widely used for the treatment and prevention of various diseases in both humans and animals in the United States and other western countries, reports of adverse reactions related to CHMs have increased.11-14 Therefore, toxicity and safety of CHM is one of the most important topics in veterinary practice. This article focuses on the analysis of the toxicity of Chinese herbs in order that toxic herbs can be identified, and properly prepared and used to reduce the incidence of adverse events.

Sunday, August 1, 2010/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (7053)/Comments (0)/
A Guide to the Selection of Yin Tonic Herbal Formulas

A Guide to the Selection of Yin Tonic Herbal Formulas

by Huisheng Xie, DVM, PhD, MS

The Yin Tonic herbal formulas are used for the treatment of Yin Deficiency Patterns. Common signs of Yin Deficiency are cool-seeking behavior, panting, hot ears/nose, restlessness or hyperactivity, irritability, low fever, a red, dry tongue, and a thin, fast pulse. The King ingredients of these formulas include Sheng Di Huang (Rehmannia), Mai Men Dong (Ophiopogon), Bai He (Lily), and Shan Zhu Yu (Cornus). Yin Deficiency often leads to generation of false Heat or Fire in the Interior. Therefore, the herbal formulas to tonify Yin are often supplemented by the herbs to clear Heat such as Zhi Mu (Anemarrhena) and Huang Bai (Phellodendron). Yin tonic herbs are sweet, cold, enriching and tend to cause stagnation, and therefore are inappropriate to use as individual herbs in certain clinical conditions. Contraindications for Yin tonic herbs include: 1) Spleen Qi Deficiency, 2) Internal Phlegm or Damp, 3) Abdominal distension, and 4) Diarrhea, unless additional herbs are added to balance the primary characteristics of the Yin tonics.
Sunday, November 1, 2009/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (11715)/Comments (0)/
Quick Questions and Answers with Dr. Xie

Quick Questions and Answers with Dr. Xie

- by Huisheng Xie, DVM PhD

Q: What does tremor or quivering in dogs mean in the TCVM?

A: Tremor, quivering, shuddering, shaking/trembling in dogs can be caused by one or more of the following patterns:

1) Internal Wind due to Liver Blood or Yin Deficiency leading to Liver Yang Rising, which causes tremor, or quivering;

2) Qi Deficiency, which fails to hold the body, leading tremor of the body, or limbs;

3) Qi or/and Blood Stagnation (the body is trying to shake stagnation away);

4) Fear or submissive behavioral issue which is associated with the disharmony between the Heart and Kidney

 

See More Questions and Answers......

Wednesday, April 1, 2009/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2470)/Comments (0)/

A GUIDE TO THE SELECTION OF QI TONIC HERBAL FORMULAS

by Huisheng Xie, DVM PhD and Justin Shmalberg, DVM CVA

1. Introduction

Qi gives life to the world. Where there is Qi, there must be life. For Chinese herbal medicine, Qi mainly refers to the physiological activity of each Zang-Fu organ. For example, Spleen Qi represents the Spleen’s function of transporting and transforming water and food. Heart Qi refers to the Heart’s physiological activities of controlling the Blood and storing the Mind. Lung Qi refers to the Lung’s function of dominating inspiration and expiration. Kidney Qi represents the Kidney’s control of the bladder, sexual function, and bones.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (15556)/Comments (0)/
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