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"Tora the Tiger" and TCVM

-by Larry McCaskill, DVM, CVA

I was contacted by the Greater Baton Rouge Zoo veterinarian to evaluate and consider a TCVM treatment plan for Tora, a 19 year old male white tiger. Primary complaints were neurological signs of ataxia, crossing of both front and rear limb while walking and CP deficits. No other specific problems were noted.

Friday, April 1, 2011/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (1908)/Comments (0)/
TCVM for the Treatment of Allergic Skin Disease in a Cat

TCVM for the Treatment of Allergic Skin Disease in a Cat

by Neal J. Sivula, DVM, PhD, FAAVA

Owner’s complaint and History: Brutus presented to my clinic on June 1, 2010. He had been pruritic around his face for the previous 2 months. Diagnostics had been negative at another veterinary clinic 2 weeks ago. Oral antibiotics had been not been effective, a trial course of oral Dexamethasone has been effective.
Friday, April 1, 2011/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (1623)/Comments (0)/
Fearful Dog Treated with TCVM

Fearful Dog Treated with TCVM

by Connie L. Clemons-Chevis, DVM, CVA, CVT, CVCH

History: A 2 year old, intact female, Portuguese water dog was brought in for loss of confidence and not performing well in high performance trials. When the dog was four months old she was very confident, out-going and the owner described her as being "a cock on the walk". At six months of age the dog started showing and did okay. At eight months of age, after some emotional trauma, the dog started acting fearful, running from strangers and acting very insecure, and loose, diarrheic stool. The dog was on Anxiety drops and was fed fish and meat-based kibble with fruits, veggies and grains. On a scale of 0-10 with 0 being the worst and 10 being the best, the dog rated a 3.
Sunday, August 1, 2010/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2200)/Comments (0)/
Rescue Horse Helped with TCVM

Rescue Horse Helped with TCVM

by Beth Hirsch, DVM

Robinson is a rescue horse, who is living in retirement. He initially presented for intermittent wet "squirts" of water following fecal production. He is always lame due to an old injury resulting in advanced arthritis in his left knee and old injury near the left front coronary band. He has difficulty lying down and getting back up, worse when it is damp and cold outside. "Robbie" is somewhat friendly and laid back, but seems to prefer routine and can be a bit reserved. He gets along with his pasture-mates for the most part, but sometimes gets grumpy and bites the cow who lives with him. Robbie’s owner’s goal is to improve his quality of life and comfort level. Robinson was seen four times over 2 months. The first treatment focused on the Spleen Qi deficiency and diarrhea, which resolved completely after the first treatment. Remaining visits focused on treating his TCVM pattern by tonifying Kidney Qi and Yang, tonifying the spleen to help eliminate damp and moving Qi to relieve pain associated with the arthritis in his left front knee and lower limb. By his last treatment obbie was doing very well, with barely noticeable lameness some days, good attitude and no diarrhea. At this time herbal treatment was chosen to extend his comfort and time between acupuncture treatments.
Sunday, August 1, 2010/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (1555)/Comments (0)/
Cat with Spinal Injury Unable to Defecate

Cat with Spinal Injury Unable to Defecate

by Susan J. Colbassani, VMD

"Jack" is a 5 year old, 10 lb. neutered male domestic shorthair cat. In October of 2006 he presented, after being hit by a car, with a badly mangled right hind leg and spinal trauma. The turned him over to the veterinarian. It was necessary to amputate the injured leg, but even with neurologic deficits in the tail and remaining leg, he was able to ambulate well and live a normal life.
Sunday, August 1, 2010/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (2197)/Comments (0)/
Chinese Veterinary Herbal Toxicity

Chinese Veterinary Herbal Toxicity

by Huisheng Xie, DVM, PhD, MS

Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has been administered to animals in China for more than 4,000 years.1 Many clinical studies have indicated that CHM is effective for treating a wide variety of medical conditions in the areas of cardiology2, dermatology3, endocrinology4, gastroenterology5, reproduction6, oncology7, immunology8, pulmonology9 and musculoskeletal conditions10. However, Chinese herbs are drugs. We must treat them as pharmaceutical medications. As CHM is more widely used for the treatment and prevention of various diseases in both humans and animals in the United States and other western countries, reports of adverse reactions related to CHMs have increased.11-14 Therefore, toxicity and safety of CHM is one of the most important topics in veterinary practice. This article focuses on the analysis of the toxicity of Chinese herbs in order that toxic herbs can be identified, and properly prepared and used to reduce the incidence of adverse events.

Sunday, August 1, 2010/Author: Chi Institute/Number of views (7007)/Comments (0)/
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